The Political Power. An aristotelian answer through the dialogue with other positions

The purpose of this contribution is to determine the essential features and main properties of the notion of political power according to the philosophical political tradition of classical Aristotelianism, represented here by some of its most eminent medieval, modern and contemporary exponents. Through a dialectical procedure (i.e., the dialogue with other positions) this paper aims at explaining the presence of seven key notes in the notion of political power as has been understood so far by the political philosophy of classical Aristotelianism, and at, indirectly, trying to suggest how, from the viewpoint of that tradition, it is possible to formulate a suitable answer to the objective problem of the reality of power as expressed by “the things themselves”, in Husserl’s terms.

Issue 141

Year 60 | 2010 Articles The dehumanization of the humanisms Vittorio Possenti La naturaleza humana en Aristóteles Antonio Prevosti Monclús Animal generation, human generation Enrique Martínez The doctrine of St. Thomas’s on “praeambula fidei”and its...

Man is more than gregarious: he is “another man’s friend”.

Both the oblivion and scorn of human sociability, or its reduction to mere gregarious condition, have dissolved one of the classic conceptual borders between the man and the animal. The rehabilitation of the distinction between gregarious and social supposes the recognition that the natural sociability is founded on the rational condition of man and his communicative capacity. In this way, Aristotle’s theory stands out in the history of Philosophy. This theory considers friendship as the relation that founds any community, and leads to a legal and political perfectionism. This one is, undoubtedly, a doctrine that considers human perfection and happiness depending also on the social and political condition. In this paper, I will analyze the Aristotle’s philosophy, but also to the central tradition of western political thought

The doctrine of St. Thomas’s on “praeambula fidei”and its relationship with the natural inclination of man to know the truth about God.

The man, who posses a rational nature, is inclined by his nature to the knowledge of the truth about God. At the same time God, in His infinite mercy, reveals the truth necessary for eternal salvation to man. This supernatural truth not only is not opposed to the natural truth, acquired by human effort, but perfects it, leading to the theological question about the relationship between reason and faith.This issue, discussed and reflected since the very origins of the Church, finds its definitive answer in Saint Thomas Aquinas’s philosophy, which has been adopted as magisterial teaching until today. The doctrine about “praeambula fidei” is an evidence that man is not required to renounce to rationality which is a characteristic of his nature, but on the contrary, thanks to the seeking of the truth he can come to believe in the su-pernatural truth, as it is rational.This pa-per aims to show how the doctrine of Thomas Aquinas’s has the necessary and sufficient theological reasons for exclusion, so as to exclude from Catholic orthodoxy not only fideism and rationalism, but also current postmetaphysical doctrines, such as the “postmetaphysical thinking” of Haber-mas’s, or weak thinking ” of Vattimo’s, or doctrines that oppose the thinking to belie-ving, or skeptical doctrines that advocate a total abandon of philosophy.

Animal generation, human generation

First, Aristotle’s general concept of nature is explained, on the basis of its definition in the Physics as an intrinsic principle of change, and also it is shown that this concept represents the essential link that exists between being and change in things. On this basis, Aristotle’s view of human nature is presented, ascending from corporeal to psychic characteristics, and finally to the intellect, which is immaterial and independent from the body, in order to see that this view is the ground on which Aristotle’s ethical and political theses are founded.

Human Nature According to Aristotle

First, Aristotle’s general concept of nature is explained, on the basis of its definition in the Physics as an intrinsic principle of change, and also it is shown that this concept represents the essential link that exists between being and change in things. On this basis, Aristotle’s view of human nature is presented, ascending from corporeal to psychic characteristics, and finally to the intellect, which is immaterial and independent from the body, in order to see that this view is the ground on which Aristotle’s ethical and political theses are founded.

The dehumanization of the humanisms

The question about humanism remains immensely necessary because it belongs to the human being and to the very antihumanism which accompanies it like a disturbing shadow. The crisis of the subject bears witness to the -most likely irreversible- fall of the modern line of subjectivism; nevertheless it leaves the category of person intact and that is what acts as a fundamental means of resistance against the dissolution of all things humanistic. The dehumanization of humanism must be diagnosed, and a way out, found. In this paper we try to answer cer-tain questions: What is modern huma-nism and which are the stages that hu-manism and antihumanism have under-gone? Which are the sources of antihu-manism? Which are its con-sequences? We will remain close to the present mo-ment and to the scientificist shapes of contemporary antihumanism. We will end with some considerations on the posthuman and transhuman