Episodic Self and Culture: G. Strawson, K. Wilkes and M. Schechtman

Gallen Strawson has played the leading role in the assault to the notion of narrative self. His theory has respected phenomenological variety of the self, but he has also held an episodic ontology, which claims for a three seconds duration of the self. This article aims to show the implications of this Theory of Mind debate in our cultural conception of the self, and the link between the strawsonian ontologically anti-narrative notion and Lipovetsky’s sociological approach to the self

Issue 139

Year 59 | 2010 Inaugural conference Christianity and person Jordi Girau Reverter Presentations The Presence of Dionysius the Areopagite and St John Damascene in the Conception of the Person of St Thomas Aquinas Ignacio Andereggen The Meaning of Agency and the Concept...

The Notion of Person in Romano Guardini (Essay of Man’s Christian Theory)

This paper aims, in broad terms, to outline the conception of person in Romano Guardini´s thought, which could be summarised like the “essay of man’s Christian theory”. For this reason we divide our presentation into three parts: general features of Romano Guardini’s anthropology with an introduction to his work, the idea of person in the philosophical anthropology and the concept of person in the theological anthropology

The Concept of Person in Miguel de Unamuno’s “Del sentimiento trágico de la vida”

This research is about the different uses of the word “person” that could be found in Unamuno´s masterpiece “Del sentimiento trágico de la vida”. As a result, we obtain a definition of person related to the difference between “person” and “individual”, the attributes of the person (particularity, will, consciousness, subjectivity, life, community, pain, purpose and immortality), and the most important relationship modes which are faith and love. It also outlines a way to acces God, who is thought as a person as well

Person and Subject in Schelling. The dnthropological dimension of his Aesthetics Work

This article focuses on Schelling’s conception of the individual. The first consideration is that this term, in fact, is absent in the work of the author. Rather, human being as a concept is treated as a subject. This term is the key to understanding his vision of the human condition and especially its spiritual dimension. The human spirit is discussed in depth and reveals itself through aesthetic considerations and research

The Knowledge of Human Person in John Locke

The thought of John Locke on the human person and his knowledge is incompatible with the Aris – totelian-Thomistic doctrine because the English author is nominalist. The lack of a gnoseological and metaphysical ground prevents from a clear idea of what is a substance and from the possibility of its knowledge

Person and personality of San Juan de la Cruz

I’ll see here Morente research on the theory of personality that is behind the mystique of Juan de la Cruz. Although Morente does not have the depth of Aquinas, his study is very interesting. Morente shows how in Juan de la Cruz’s mystique a concept of person underlies as subsistent individual of rational nature. From the own dynamism of the mystical experience and of its purgative routes, both of the sense and of the spirit, there is revealed that the concept of person in Juan de la Cruz connects with that of Boethius

Person and Personality. From contemporary Psychology of Personality to Thomistic Metaphysics of the Person

In contemporary psychology there have been two opposing solutions to the problem of the relationship between person and personality. The first and most popular is dependent on the development of empiricist philosophy. It’s the total identification between person and the operating structure obtained trough biological and psychosocial development. Thus, they deny the substantiality of person, and states that person emerges when personality has been developed. The other solution is more in line with German philosophy and Kantian rationalism. It consists of the distinction between psychological and personality ontological personality, so much so that it appears that these are two completely separate things. This article proposes a solution to the problem in the light of the Thomistic metaphysics of person, which avoids the problems of both positions, and saves both substantial and historic character of the human person.

The remote background: prÒswpon in Greek Literature

The word person and its derivatives in romance languages, comes from the Latin persōna, which, in turn, came from the Etruscan Persu. On the other hand, the Greek word prÒswpon evolved in such a way that, although originally meaning face, it also ended up including the meaning of the Latin word persōna. Moreover it included lately the sense of mask, which was just the meaning of the Etruscan
Persu. This article succinctly shows the evolution of the term prÒswpon from its use in the most ancient Greek Literature texts until the time when it became available to the early medieval theologists. Throughout its evolution a whole range of potential meanings were covered by the term prÒswpon. In spite of not having specific philosophical connotations at the beginning of its use, it ended up encompassing several meanings which were later used to define the metaphysics of the person

The Term prÒswpon in the Meeting of Faith and Reason

This paper deals with the meaning of the term prÒswpon in Scripture with the purpose of framing it in the context of the encounter between faith and reason. Originally this term does not directly mean the concept person, but it hides it in a veiled way under the sense of face. The richness of this concept is expressed with the revelation of the gratuity of the supernatural elevation of man, through which is introduced in the presence of God’s face. Then the Greek concept of face changes from water into the wine of the Christian concept of person

The Crisis of the Concept of Person in the Modern Psychology and Its Origins

The crisis of the modern civilisation is an anthropological one. First, Luther denied the free will. Then, other philosophers and theologians as Arnold Geulincx and Friedrich Schleiermacher have criticized the idea of man as a rational being endowed with free will. Finally, the founders of important psychological schools (Sigmund Freud, Carl Gustav Jung, Erich Fromm and Carl Rogers) describe the forces (natural, biological and social) that would determine the man, offer purely naturalistic interpretations of the human condition and discount his personal dimension

Approach to the Concept of Person in Antonio Millán-Puelles

Antonio Millán-Puelles (1921-2005) has done interesting contributions to the philosophic theory of the person. In the anthropologic level, Millán- Puelles develops a philosophy about the dignity of the human person, because, without forgetting what man and animal have in common, he emphasizes the man’s superiority. This dignity is double: innate and acquired. In the order of the innate dignity, Millán Puelles has underlined the condition of creature that man has, the reality of his nature, the subjectivity, the freedom and the immortality of the human soul. Respecting to the acquired dignity, I schematize in four points the most relevant contributions: 1º, the thesis that morality is the free affirmation of our being; 2º, the educability; 3º, the elevation to the common good as a moral necessity; and 4º, the affirmation that theoretic life is the superior human life. In regard to the metaphysic of the person, Millán- Puelles adds two elements to his acceptation of the boecian-tomistic idea of the person: personality as pure perfection and a proof of God’s existence as an Absolute Person

The Person in Kant

In contrast with the classical notion of “person”, that emphasizes the metaphysical subject as the ground of rational activity, Kant, as indeed the greater part of modern philosophers, swaps the terms of this relation giving pride of place to the operative dimension of the person, in detriment to the indispensable metaphysical ground. This swap gives origin to a double tendency: one, of resolution of the subject into his acts; and another, subsequently, of the substantialitation of the acts into fragmentary and disconnected entities. Of the distinct levels of the I in Kant’s philosophy (the empiric I, the logical I, the metaphysical I and the moral I), it is only to the moral I that the title of person belongs

The Meaning of Agency and the Concept of Person in Martin Luther

Luther, against the scholastic conception of person, holds that there is not a subsistent subject. Departing from the Biblical exegesis he indicates as a constitutive of the person his outward appearance. Man is just flesh and is dominated by sin, according to Lutheran terminology. Hence he holds that there is no free will, breaking with the whole previous tradition. Freedom is only attributed to God. Only the faith, because of the adhesion to Jesus Christ, constitutes the person. It is the person who does the works. Insofar man needs a certain safety on the validity of his agency. Thus the way is opened to utilitarian and existencialist conceptions.

The Meaning of Agency and the Concept of Person in Martin Luther

Luther, against the scholastic conception of person, holds that there is not a subsistent subject. Departing from the Biblical exegesis he indicates as a constitutive of the person his outward appearance. Man is just flesh and is dominated by sin, according to Lutheran terminology. Hence he holds that there is no free will, breaking with the whole previous tradition. Freedom is only attributed to God. Only the faith, because of the adhesion to Jesus Christ, constitutes the person. It is the person who does the works. Insofar man needs a certain safety on the validity of his agency. Thus the way is opened to utilitarian and existencialist conceptions.

The Presence of Dionysius the Areopagite and St John Damascene in the Conception of the Person of St Thomas Aquinas

The writing is divided in three parts: in the first place, the consideration of the presence of Dionysius the Areopagita in Aquinas’ work; in second term, some reflections about Saint John Damascene‘s influence in the production of Aquinas; in third place, some brief mentions of the texts of Thomas where is proven such an influence, especially in the Summa, with a succinct comparative reference regarding other works in the person’s topic

Christianity and person

As far as it is given to know ancient cultures and religions had a more or less personal notion of divinity. They were many times polytheistic and generally enoteístas, their olimpos, their heavens, lands and seas, and also their hells, were populated by beings sometimes very blurred, other times zoomorphic or anthropomorphic. The Hesiod Theogonies offer us the Greek case, and today we have huge encyclopedias of the History of Religions for that same case and all the others. First of all, they are gods with whom one enters into relationships through worship, sacrifices and prayer, and from whom help and benefits are expected, or curses or punishments are feared. It is what in Phenomenology they call the religious object.